Guidelines for operation development of government agencies focused on the problems of young Thai Muslims in the three southern border provinces of Thailand

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Thongphon Promsaka Na Sakolnakorn

Abstract

The aims of this research were to study the problems of young Muslims in the three southern border provinces of Thailand, to study the management methods of government agencies employed to solve the problems faced by young Muslims, and to study the results of government activities, as well as to suggest guidelines for solving the problems faced by young Muslims. Qualitative methods were utilized in this study, including in-depth interviews with 41 participants and a focus group of 30 participants who met three times to discuss management and policy guidelines for the Thai government. The data were then analyzed using content analysis and descriptive analysis. The study found that the most significant problems facing young Muslims are drug addiction, lack of education, inappropriately timed pregnancies, and violence. In addition, most government projects are unsuccessful because they operate only in the short term and tackle symptoms instead of the root causes of problems. Moreover, most young Muslims who complete training programs go back to their homes, where they face the risk of returning to their former bad behavior, since drugs and insurgent groups are ever present in their communities. In addition, this study will be beneficial to the Royal Thai Government as a guideline for solving the problems of young Muslims in the three southern border provinces of Thailand.

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How to Cite
PROMSAKA NA SAKOLNAKORN, Thongphon. Guidelines for operation development of government agencies focused on the problems of young Thai Muslims in the three southern border provinces of Thailand. Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, [S.l.], v. 40, n. 3, p. 711–717, oct. 2019. ISSN 2452-3151. Available at: <http://kuojs.lib.ku.ac.th/index.php/kjss/article/view/3050>. Date accessed: 22 nov. 2019.
Section
Research articles