A comparative study on nutrient utilization in Murrah buffalo bulls fed conventional and crop residue based complete rations

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K. Raja Kishore D. Srinivas Kumar J.V. Ramana A. Ravi E. Raghava Rao

Abstract

An experiment was conducted to study the effect of feeding complete rations on nutrient utilization compared to conventional system of feeding in Murrah buffalo bulls. Four adult Murrah buffalo bulls (5 years; 350±9.36 kg BW) divided into four groups in a 4x4 Latin square switch over design were offered isonitrogenous complete rations comprising of locally available crop residues viz. maize stover (T1 ), red gram straw (T2 ) and black gram straw (T3 ) and concentrate mixture in 60:40 ratio, respectively and a conventional ration (C) for a period of 28 days. The DM intake (kg/d) was similar in all the experimental rations. The digestibility (%) of CP, EE, CF, NDF, ADF, hemicelluloses and cellulose were higher (P<0.01) in buffalo bulls fed complete rations than those fed conventional ration. However, the digestibility (%) of DM (P<0.01) and OM (P<0.05) were higher in T1 and NEF (P<0.05) was higher in T2 when compared to other experimental rations. The Nitrogen retention (g/d) was higher (P<0.01) in the animals fed complete rations than those fed conventional ration and the differences for calcium and phosphorus balance (g/d) were not significant among the different experimental rations. The DM and TDN intake per W kg0.75 were higher (P<0.05) in buffaloes fed C while higher (P<0.05) DCP intake per W kg0.75 was observed in buffalo bulls fed T2 . Hence, it is concluded that the crop residue based complete rations had a significant effect on nutrient utilization in Murrah buffalo bulls compared to conventional ration.

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How to Cite
KISHORE, K. Raja et al. A comparative study on nutrient utilization in Murrah buffalo bulls fed conventional and crop residue based complete rations. Buffalo Bulletin, [S.l.], v. 35, n. 4, p. 587-594, dec. 2016. ISSN 2539-5696. Available at: <https://kuojs.lib.ku.ac.th/index.php/BufBu/article/view/1329>. Date accessed: 15 may 2021.
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