Management of cervico-vaginal prolapse in non descript buffalo - A case report

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Sujit Mathew Kolangath Chavan Nitin Bhaskar Khatke Prashant Abaji Dube Yogesh Subhash

Abstract

Uterine prolapse is a common post partum obstetrical malady of buffaloes occurring during the third stage of parturition. A 8 year old non descript buffalo, in the 3rd lactation, w as presented at the farmers premises at Akkalkuwa, district Nandurbar, Maharashtra, India with a complaint of cervico-vaginal prolapse which was reported to occur after 3 h of expulsion of the fetal membranes. Clinico - gynaecological examination revealed temperature of the animal was 101.3oF, heart rate 83 per minute, respiration rate 23 per minute, congested mucous membranes, straining and signs of discomfort. Examination revealed that the temperature of the animal was 101.3oF, heart rate 83 per minute, respiration rate 23 per minute, congested mucous membranes. Blood analysis revealed haemoglobin level 8 gm/dl, differential leucocyte count revealed neutrophils 62%, eosinophils 9%, basophils 0%, lymphocytes 27% and monocytes 2%. The biochemical analysis revealed serum calcium 7.01 mg/dl, serum phosphorus 3.14 mg/dl, serum magnesium 1.21 mg/dl. The case was rationally treated following the chronology of reduce, reposition and retain. Reduction of the prolapsed mass was initiated with ice packs, uterine mass was elated to relieve the urinary bladder and make space for uterus. The uterine mass was repositioned and retained with the help of rope truss untill straining stopped. Rational treatment to contain infection and initiate healing was administered along with mineral and vitamin supplementation. The buffalo recovered uneventfully without an episode of relapse. The case report highlights the non invasive method of management of cervico-vaginal prolapse in buffalo.

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How to Cite
KOLANGATH, Sujit Mathew et al. Management of cervico-vaginal prolapse in non descript buffalo - A case report. Buffalo Bulletin, [S.l.], v. 39, n. 4, p. 531-537, dec. 2020. ISSN 2539-5696. Available at: <https://kuojs.lib.ku.ac.th/index.php/BufBu/article/view/2419>. Date accessed: 15 may 2021.
Section
Case Report