Epidemiological studies on gastrointestinal parasites of buffaloes in seven agro-climatic zones of Madhya Pradesh, India

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S. Nath G. Das A.K. Dixit V. Agrawal A.K. Singh S. Kumar R.N. Katuri

Abstract

In the present study 3779 feacal samples of buffaloes were collected from the seven agroclimatic zones of Madhya Pradesh state, India. The study was conducted for a period of one year from April 2011 to March 2012. The prevalence of gastrointestinal (GI) parasitic infection was 55.65% (2143). Amphistomes (28.10%) being the most prevalent GI parasite followed by Strongyle (25.59%), Schistosoma sp. (5.19%), Strongyloides sp. (3.15%), Trichuris sp. (2.59%), Fasciola sp. (2.30%), Toxocara (0.66%) and Monezia sp. (0.42%). Among non helmithic infection coccidian showed prevalence of 19.00%. Out of the seven zones, zone V (Central Narmada valley) had the highest prevalence (61.46%) and the Hills of Jhabua zone XII had the lowest prevalence (50.42%). Prevalence in calves was more (59.78%) as compared to adult (54.36%). Season wise highest prevalence was observed in monsoon (73.41%) followed by winter (60.47%) and then summer (36.22%). Prevalence of coccidiosis (25.00%) was highest in winter. Monthly prevalence data showed highest prevalence in the month of August (79.68%) and lowest in the month of April (28.25%). Mean EPG of strongylewas 321.8 and highest intensity of strongyle infection was recorded in the month of July (513.1). Coproculture examination revealed that Haemonchus being the predominant (72.08%) nematode genus, followed by Trichostrongylus (11.42%), Oesophagostomum (10.08%), Bunostomum (3.75%) and Strongyloides (2.67%). The current investigation provide basis to formulate strategic control measures against GI parasitism.

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How to Cite
NATH, S. et al. Epidemiological studies on gastrointestinal parasites of buffaloes in seven agro-climatic zones of Madhya Pradesh, India. Buffalo Bulletin, [S.l.], v. 35, n. 3, p. 355-364, sep. 2016. ISSN 2539-5696. Available at: <https://kuojs.lib.ku.ac.th/index.php/BufBu/article/view/1104>. Date accessed: 28 sep. 2021.
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