Prenatal development of buffalo major salivary glands: Gross morphological and biometrical studies

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A.D. Singh Opinder Singh

Abstract

The present study was aimed at elucidating the gross morphology, morphometry and biometry of major salivary glands of buffalo during different prenatal as well as neonatal stages. The study was conducted on major salivary glands of twentyfour buffalo foetuses as well as six neonatal buffalo calves. Three pairs of major salivary glands viz., parotid, mandibular and sublingual were distinguished during prenatal and neonatal life in the buffalo. The mandibular gland was the largest among the three major salivary glands in prenatal buffalo, which may be attributed to its early development among all the salivary glands. The sublingual gland was the smallest among the three major salivary glands in prenatal buffalo and measured about half the size of the mandibular gland. At 5.8 cm CVRL (54th day), the mandibular gland began to form an epithelial outgrowth into the mesenchyme, forming the floor of the mouth in the linguo-gingival groove. At 6 cm CVRL (55th day), the sublingual gland arose as a number of small epithelial thickenings in the linguogingival groove and each thickening formed its own canal. Grossly, the superior (polystomatic) and inferior (monostomatic) parts of the sublingual gland were distinguishable at 16.5 cm CVRL (102nd day). At 6.9 cm CVRL (60th day), the parotid gland was seen in the form of a small rod, extending dorsally from the lateral part of the oral cavity, just below and infront of the external ear and behind the facial nerve. Significant differences in the biometrical parameters of all major salivary glands between foetuses of Group I, II, III as well as neonatal buffalo were observed at P≤0.05 and P≤0.01 level.

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SINGH, A.D.; SINGH, Opinder. Prenatal development of buffalo major salivary glands: Gross morphological and biometrical studies. Buffalo Bulletin, [S.l.], v. 36, n. 1, p. 155-168, mar. 2017. ISSN 2539-5696. Available at: <https://kuojs.lib.ku.ac.th/index.php/BufBu/article/view/716>. Date accessed: 18 may 2021.
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Original Article